Africa

Johannesburg

Joined the programme in 2016

Johannesburg became the first city on the African continent to join the Cities Changing Diabetes programme, in 2016. Fast-paced urbanisation over the last two decades has made Johannesburg a vibrant and diverse city, yet it has also fuelled several major challenges. Lack of housing, inner city decay, high unemployment, crime and inadequate health provisions have all combined to create an environment conducive to NCDs such as type 2 diabetes. 

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Johannesburg, South Africa

The diabetes challenge in Johannesburg

Johannesburg became the first city on the African continent to join the Cities Changing Diabetes programme, in 2016. Fast-paced urbanisation over the last two decades has made Johannesburg a vibrant and diverse city, yet it has also fuelled several major challenges. Lack of housing, inner city decay, high unemployment, crime and inadequate health provisions have all combined to create an environment conducive to NCDs such as type 2 diabetes.  

Key facts and figures

47.1%

of the adult population in South Africa is physically inactive.1

29%

of the sample population being overweight and a further 37.0% having obesity.2

46%

was not aware they had the condition.3

2045

If action is not taken, the prevalence of diabetes could increase from 11% today to 16.2% by 2045.4

About the programme

Since 2016, the city of Johannesburg and the Cities Changing Diabetes programme have helped mobilise academic partners and experienced, retired nurses to conduct research and map the extent of the diabetes burden as well as its comorbidities, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and dyslipidaemia in the public health sector.

Today, this research is being applied to inform policy recommendations, such as the implementation of risk-based screening for diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia in all health facilities.

"The Cities Changing Diabetes research findings are a key component in the fight against diabetes, as they will largely inform all efforts aimed at decreasing the burden of non-communicable or chronic diseases caused by poor lifestyle choices in the city of Jo'burg."

 Cllr Mpho Phalatse, MC for Health and Social Development, Johannesburg

Download Johannesburg case study

References

1.

WHO. Diabetes Country Profile, South Africa. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2016.

2.

Basu D, Lebethe E, Ohaju E, et al. Unpublised report: Cities Changing Diabetes in Johannesburg. 2016

3.

NCD Risk Factor Collaboration. Trends in adult body-mass index in 200 countries from 1975 to 2014: a pooled analysis of 1698 population-based measurement studies with 19.2 million participants. Lancet. 2016;387(10026):1377–1396. 4. Shisana O. The South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: SANHANES-1. HSRC press; 20

4.

Cities Changing Diabetes. Diabetes Projection Model, Johannesburg. Data on file. Novo Nordisk. In: Incentive, ed. Holte, Denmark. 2017.